To Print or to Email: A Modern Save the Date Dilemma

Many of us are extremely reliant on technology, and expectedly, so have weddings. Whether you’re creating the perfect wedding hashtag, taking selfies from the dressing room to the reception or texting your wedding party last-minute details, there is a good chance you’re using technology. The question is: how much do you let the online world creep into wedding traditions?

Save the date cards are a popular, courteous, tradition that many continue to follow today. When you’re planning for a wedding at least a year in advance, sending out a quick notice to family and friends you want to attend lets them know you want them there, and is a kind way to assure it. However, as the price of weddings rises, is having a separate, personalized, printed expense worth it? With sites like Paperless Post, and Evite, making an online card is easier than ever.

Pros

  • Cost: Sending an online save the date is usually free and includes a variety of cute templates to choose from.

  • Quick and Easy: While some sites have the option to download or create your own invite from scratch, the template option only needs you to fill in the blanks on a beautifully designed page. You don’t have to fret about an extra design or order from the printer, plus you can do it in one sitting. You also save time by adding email addresses, not entire home addresses. Did Uncle Pete move this spring? Maybe, but he probably has the same email address either way.

  • Immediate Response: With a quick email, you’ll know right away whether or not someone received your notice. Nothing gets lost through the postal service, and you don’t have to wait a few days to check in to see if your family got the email. Everyone is constantly looking at their phones, so they are sure to see it right away.

Credit: Paperless Post (paperlesspost.com)

Credit: Paperless Post (paperlesspost.com)

Cons

  • Look: If your wedding has more of an elegant theme, an email may not be the best way to announce the date, not to mention you may not be able to find a template that matches the paper invite you’re planning to send later. That doesn’t mean it’s tacky, it just might not go with your overall theme and feel. If you can afford a paper save the date, it may be a better option.

  • Does Grandma Use Her Email: A better question may even be: does Grandma have an email? While the majority of us have the internet at our finger tips all hours of the day, there are still people who don’t use it as much, if at all. You should be sure that everyone on your guest list checks their email regularly, and better yet, make sure they all have one. If email is still the best option for you, you may have to make an exception for those who don’t.

  • Spam: You’ll never know for sure whether or not your email will get to the right folder. Some guests may find it in their inbox right away, while others may not even know you sent it if it happens into the spam folder. In this way, it can just as easily be lost as a mailed letter, if not more so. If email is still your best option, be sure to check in with your recipients to make sure it was received and if not, have them check their spam folder.

Save the dates, like every aspect on your wedding checklist, is unique to each couple. While sending a physical copy in the mail is more traditional, the modern reliance on technology and higher price of weddings can make sending a notice over the internet a better option for some. Luckily there are a number of online resources for both options! The choice is yours!

House of Brides